Making Home Working Work

With almost half of the UK workforce now being home-based we’re facing challenges none of us could ever have anticipated. So, what can we do to help focus attention, minimise distraction and perhaps most importantly, not end up totally burnt out?


Research shows that negative emotions narrow the ability to focus while positive emotions can broaden it; when people feel good, they are more creative, adaptable and efficient. Try to notice what information you’re consuming. Especially during the working day, really try to limit the negativity you expose yourself to and where possible take an hour to do something that makes you feel good.


Really try to limit the negativity you expose yourself to.

1) Plan for your most productive moments


We all have two types of attention: Proactive - the two to the three hours a day that we are at our most productive; Active - the few hours afterward where we are still able to focus but are not as effective. For most of us, our proactive attention peaks during the morning, so this is the time we should use to generate new ideas or tackle the most important tasks of the day. Try to resist the temptation to simply get through emails as soon as the working day starts as you risk squandering your proactive, most productive time. Instead, use your active attention time to catch up on emails, do routine jobs and take calls. Making a ‘to-do’ list at the end of every day can help you delegate your time most efficiently between proactive, and active hours.


Making a ‘to-do’ list at the end of every day can help you delegate your time most efficiently between proactive, and active hours.

Photo by Aleks Marinkovic on Unsplash

2) Break goals into small tasks


Starting a large work project while at home can feel really tough; by breaking it down into small chunks it will be much more manageable to get going and once you’re underway, easier to stay with it. We’re less likely to have our productivity derailed if we allocate tasks into 15-minute slots and use these small increments to build towards the bigger goal.

We’re less likely to have our productivity derailed if we allocate tasks into 15-minute slots and use these small increments to build towards the bigger goal.

3) Use a shared calendar


Using a shared company calendar is great. It’s far better for your colleagues to know when you’re taking a break for lunch or picking the kids up. Being open and upfront about commitments stops the frustrations of being out of contact by managing expectations. It’s ok to be balancing work and home life!


Being open and upfront about commitments stops the frustrations of being out of contact by managing expectations. It’s ok to be balancing work and home life!

At Wardman UK, we’re working together to overcome these challenges using our expertise and technology to promote positive attitudes and habits. Working securely, collaboratively, communicating with ease and managing large workloads is part of the DNA of our business. It’s our belief that if we can understand what you do, the culture you have and your concerns that we can boost your business with technology that makes your team happier and more productive. If we can help your business through these times and beyond, please get in touch!

Published in Konect October 2020


This column is contributed by Eve Wardman, co-founder and director of Wardman UK Ltd, the Lothian’s premier IT and Microsoft Cloud Solutions provider.

Visit wardmanuk.com

© 2020 Lothian Publications Ltd

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